venerdì 21 marzo 2014

Rustic Tuscan Wedding Villa - Lungarno Special Weddings Proudly featured on Style Me Pretty!

With a big honour Lungarno Special Weddings is now featured on Style Me Pretty blog, one of the most important magazine and blogs dedicated to weddings!

The featured wedding is the one of Angela and Brian, a German-American couple living in Boston. who has choosen the views of Tuscany and of Luccan Hills as set of their wedding. Ceremony and reception dinner were celebrated at Villa Lean, a XII century villa, with its beautiful views of the Lucca Valley and relaxing setting amongst olive groves and vineyards and they couldn’t find better place to celebrate it! Decorations and florals by Franci's Flowers and stunning photos from Lisa Poggi tell all about their special day.

You can read the article of this wedding on Style Me Pretty Blog and sneack a peak here at some pictures courtesy by Lisa Poggi.















http://www.lungarnoweddings.it/

sabato 15 febbraio 2014

MEDIEVAL VILLAGES IN TUSCANY - CERTALDO

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Certaldo

Its history is documented since 1164 when Federico Barbarossa accorded the territory to the Alberti counts, who ruled there until the end of 13th century.
In 1293 the castle passed under the Florentine seignory, as an out-post on the Via Francigena, traced along the valley foot of the Elsa. After the desctruction of the close fortress of Pogni and Semifonte, Certaldo became walled up land, and since 1415was the seat of the three Vicariates of Florentine Republic, that of the Valdelsa, assuming the role of the most important political and judicial centre of the territory.


The castle has an irregular shape like a sort of up-side-down L surrounded by a still almost intact circle of walls built in different epochs and in which open three doors: the Aberto one in the west, the Porta al Sole in the direction of Siena and the Porta al Rivellino placed on the edge of the L towards south-east, In the most crucial and high part of the castle, that were the two main roads meet, stands leaning against the walls the most important building, the Palazzo Pretorio, formerly seat of the Vicar, which was built in different stages on the structure of the ancient Alberti's fortress, of which remains the 12th century circular tower, even if the most vast and relevant intervention took place at the beginning of the 14th century.

Certaldo - Palazzo Pretorio












Certaldo - Palazzo Pretorio Courtyard
 
It is one of the most characteristic and articulated of the public palaces in Tuscany, with a multifunctional, we may say today, interior since it gathers a residential quarter of the Vicar, an audience hall, a hall seat of the local court, a meeting hall for the government, a jail with men's and womens sections, a courtyard with open gallery.The facade shows more than thirty vicarial coats of arm, aslo stretching to the vestibule and in the courtyard. An outside ope gallery proves a further public function of the building, near which stands the late-Romanesque church os Santi Tommaso and Prospero.

Certaldo - Santi Tommaso and Prospero Church















Along the roads there are 13th-14th and XV century buildings, characterized by the warm tones of terracotta, that has also a match in the road paving.
Among these, much restored, is also the house of Giovanni Boccaccio, died here in 1373. His tomb and his cenotaph are in the church of Santi Jacopo and Michele, other building characterising the urban landscape of Certaldo, a sample of late-Romanesque brickwork building with a doule order cloister.

(Source: Bruno Bruchi e Alessandro Naldi, Medieval Villages in Tuscany.)
 

lunedì 13 gennaio 2014

The importance of the inspection visit

The importance of the inspection visit

Good morning and good beginning of week...
The importance of an inspection visit and... the importance of the imagination...
Sometimes things appear so different in different seasons... This is a beautiful venue near the Etruscan Coast, in Tuscany... This is how it appears in Winter... Would you like to get married here? Tomorrow you'll see the same venue in Summer...
Stay tuned! ;-)


Francesca




Photo by Francesca Ferrucci - LUNGARNO Special Weddings
 

sabato 4 gennaio 2014

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Buonconvento

 

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Buonconvento
Buonconvento is the typical model of walled land of the Sienese territory. A fortified village founded along the Via Francigena and in the moment of the maximum flourishing of the traffics (the 13th century) also placed near the confluence point of the Arbia in the Ombrone, A place that Siena considered strategic in the defensive system of the country land, so much that already in 1270 Buonconvento was seat of a Podestaria.
In 1366 the Sienese Republic decided to provide Buonconvento with a circle of walls that was completed in 1371. In 1480 the capital ground granted to the village inhabitants the priviledge of the Sienese citizenship.
Considered the placing of Buonconvento in a territory that has met an equilibrate economical development preserving a rural aspect not much different from the traditional one, the urban plan of the built-up area is almost intact.
The urban centre is still characterised by the rectangular plan given by the circle of walls still nowdays preserved in most part, except for the southern side in wich a part of the walls were pulled down. On the opposite, on the northern side, still opens the monumental Porta Sienese. This gateway, completely made in brickwork and still complete in the ancient wooden leaves, preserves its elegant, original structure with the bar arch surmonted by the lunette crouded by little arches. The whole urban plan developes on he north-south axe (the ancient Francigena Way), on wich overlook the 18th parish church of San Pietro e Paolo (founded in the 14th century) and the Palazzo Pretorio, adorned with the escutcheons of the Sienese Podestà and sided by a small tower that, in the structure, evidently recalls the shapes of the tower of the Palazzo Pubblico in Siena. Near the building, siding the Palazzo Pretorio stands the XIX century Palazzo Ricci Socini, renewed with Liberty decorations at the beginning of the XX century.
 
 
 

Buonconvento - phot by Lungarno Special Weddings

Buonconvento - photo by Lungarno Special Weddings

Buonconvento - photo by Lungarno Special Weddings

venerdì 18 ottobre 2013

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Casole d'Elsa

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Casole d'Elsa

Placed in the high Val d'Elsa, in a border territory harshly contended during the centuries by Florence and Siena, the castle of Casole is remembered since the 11th century as an important fortification of the bishops of Volterra, but became a free Municipality since 1201.
Entered the range of influence of Siena in 1240, after a short occupation by the Florentines passed definitively undr Siena's domination after the victory of Montaperti (1260).Some epemerals claims of autonomy, supported by one of the main families of Casole, the Del Porrina, forced Siena to rebuild in 1359 the ancient fortress in the typical shapes of te military architecture of Siena.
A similar measure recurred at the end of 15th century when the fortifications were readapted with the intervention of Francesco Di Giorgio; the two circulars towers in the North-East side of the walls date back to this last intervention.

The circle of walls is for most part visible in the elliptical shape characterising the village.
The built-up area seems develope around the central axe connected the two main gateways (nowadays lost) that dei Frati northwards and that al Rivellino southwards near which there is the Rocca Senese (nowadays seat of the Town Hall).

Along the main road nowadays via Casolani, many charming palaces follow one another that peserve meaningful remains of medieval structures (most all brick archivots of doors and windows). Among these stand out the ex Convento dei Serviti, at the northern entrance of the village, the 13th century Palace and Tower dei Porrina, the Palazzo Pretorio with the facade decorated with escutcheons and, finally, the collegiate formerly parish church of Santa Maria Assunta, consacrated in 1161, which preserves the facade and the perimetric walls of the Romanic building from the 12th century.

(Source: Bruno Bruchi e Alessandro Naldi, Medieval Villages in Tuscany.)

See also:
http://www.casole.it/
http://www.turismo.intoscana.it/site/it/localita/Casole-dElsa-00005/
Photo of Casole d'Elsa


Photo of Casole d'Elsa


Photo of Casole d'Elsa


 

lunedì 14 ottobre 2013

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Tonda

Medieval Villages in Tuscany - Tonda and Castelfalfi
 
Tonda
The hamlet of Tonda lies between Montaione and San Vivaldo, about three km east from the Sacro Monte (Holy Mount). Both the village and its castle probably adte back to the beginning of 13th century, when, according to a document, the german emperor Otto IV gave the feud and the castle, the bearby houses and all their inhabitants to some noblemen from Pisa.
Purchased in 1267 by the town of San Miniato and subdued to the Medici family, the Lords of Tuscany and Florence in 1370, the castle of Tonda featured hamlet walls, within which stood a church, a tower, a cistern for rain waterand the Town Hall.
In 1379, after being annexed to the town of Montaione, Tonda included a small hospital and a podesteria (the tenure of Podestà).

Castelfalfi
Situated to the west of Montaione, the hamlet of Castelfalfi stands out among the fortified villages of the region for its dimensions and singularity. It originated in the 8th century, probably taking its name form a certain longobard called Faolfi. In 754 Walfredo of Watgauso della Gherardesca mentions Castelfalfi on the occasion of a gift to the Abbey of Monteverdi. In 1139 the castle was sold by Ranieridella Gherardesca to the Bishop of Volterra. in the 13th century the castle parish church of San Floriano had some thirteen subsidiary churches. In 1475 Giovanni di Francesco Gaetani and his wife Costanza de' Medici restaured the castle and had a noble residence built right in the centre of the village. Castelfalfi was plundered and set on fire by the troops of Piero Strozzi in 1554, at the time when Florence and Siena were at war.
The high medieval settlement was reconstructed at the end of the 14th century, after the original langobard structures had been destroyed.
The mighty defensive buildings are enhaced by the volumes of the round big tower of the walls and by the high quadrangular keep, open on three sides, that rises up close to the short, yet composite, hamlet walls , featuring well-preserved brackets. Inside the castle stands the church of San Floriano, today appearing with late romanesuqe structures, a single nave with a false transept and a rounded archivolt and with a dichromatic white-green facade.

(Source: Bruno Bruchi e Alessandro Naldi, Medieval Villages in Tuscany.)

See also:
http://www.comune.montaione.fi.it/
http://www.turismo.intoscana.it/site/en/town/Montaione/

Photo of Castelfalfi near Montaione

Photo of Castelfalfi, near Montaione

Photo of Castelfalfi near Montaione

Photo of Castelfalfi near Montaione




Photo of Tonda near Montaione in Tuscany


Photo of Tonda near Montaione in Tuscany

Photo of Tonda, near Montaione in Tuscany

Photo of Tonda, near Montaione in Tuscany
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